Trekking from the southernmost point of Norway to the North Cape?!

As we have announced a few days ago, Renjer is an official supporter of Gina Johansen (@ginajohansen91) and her partner Stig-Rune on their Norge på langs (NPL) tour 2019. In case you do not know what that exactly means, let us tell you more about this extraordinary adventure that only a handful of people dare trying every year. 

“The aim of Norge på langs is to walk from the South of Norway to the Nordkapp”

Norge på langs has no completely fixed rules, but the basic aim is to traverse Norway from South to North or the other way around. The most famous starting point is Kap Lindesnes, the southernmost point of Norway and a typical and iconic destination is the North Cape, with its famous globe – even though it’s technically not the northernmost point of Norway. The whole journey is between 2600 – 3000 km long, depending on the chosen route. Most people do the trip it in summer and need between 100-120 days. Did you know that the record is only 42 days? Those are unbelievable 60-70 km per day on average – all by foot! 

“The adventurers are treated with respect – local people often invite NPL adventurers to their homes for food”

On the trip you have the chance to see the full spectrum of Norway’s beauty – fjords, barren hills, impressive mountain ranges and wild rivers. And on top of that you will most likely experience the hospitality of the Norwegian people. Many of the adventurers that walk Norge på langs report that they are often invited into people’s homes and treated for food, as soon as these people hear about the NPL tour. So you can be sure that both the nature as well as the people will create memories during this trip that you won’t forget for the rest of your life. 

“The journey is not for beginners – you will walk 25 km per day carrying food, tent and other necessities”

However, you should be aware that a certain level of stamina/endurance is definitely required, to finish this hike. If you want to make it within the 120 days of summer in Norway, you need to walk an average of 25 km a day and probably more if you include rest days. That itself is not a huge problem, but considering that at any time you are carrying between 20-25 kg on your back, the whole thing suddenly sounds more challenging. As you are often for several days in complete wilderness, you need equipment like a tent, a sleeping bag, a mattress, a cooker and food for at least a week. On top of that you should have 2 litres of water with you at all times. 

“Great way to escape your daily routines”

But why do people even go on this trip and find the motivation? The answer often is that they want to escape their daily routines of a 9 to 5 job and a never ending cycle of the alarm clock in the morning, the commute to work, the daily stress and all the commitments. This was for example the case for Stig-Rune, Gina’s partner, but also for another famous adventurer – Simon Michalowicz from Germany. In 2013, he got tired of his old IT job and decided to do the tour.

He was not particularly trained at that time but he was determined to fulfil his dream and after 140 days he really arrived at the North Cape. And the best thing about it: he wrote an inspiring book about his journey (Amazon.de, in German), describing all his experiences, small failures and lots of moments of happiness and thankfulness. We really recommend reading it.

“Your first trip to Norway doesn’t have to be NPL right away”

We hope we could inspire you to use this summer for a hiking trip, however long or wherever you want. Being out in the nature and forgetting about all the daily stress and sorrows is something we can only recommend to everyone. It does not have to be Norge på langs right away though 😉 In case Norge på langs is not the right thing for you to do at the moment we have some other suggestions for Norway. We at Renjer have been to various places in Norway that can be discovered easily and in less time. Check out our favourite places in Norway. To be honest they are all best experienced when you drive up with car. Alternatively you can fly, but please note that you will often need to transfer planes in Oslo

1. Lofoten

The magnificent island group of Lofoten, located high above Arctic Circle provides with unique views, beaches and hikes. It is also our absolute favourite in Norway.

The picture above is taken by us from the legendary Reinebringen hike, which can be done in less than 3 hours. You need to be careful though and we recommend hiring a guide.

Lofoten has many hotels and small accommodations and out of them we can recommend Sakrisøy Rorbuer and Nyvågar Rorbuhotell. Lofoten is also great for fishing and camping – there are many camping sites around the islands.

2. Utne

Utne is located at the picturesque Hardangerfjord and surrounded by breathtaking nature. There are many hiking possibilities around. Additionally, you can also take the fjord ferry to visit other villages around in the area. Only taking the fjord ferry itself is something to remember for the lifetime.

Utne can be a location to stay for some days itself or a brief stop if you are planning to travel further up the Norwegian coast surrounded by fjords. Last but not least, Utne has a beautiful hotel called Utne Hotel that has been hosting guests since 1722. Even if you are not staying in Utne, it’s definitely worth checking out.

3. Balestrand

Balestrand is located by the beautiful Sognefjord. Here you can fish everywhere and hike on the surrounding mountains. After a long day out in the nature you can rest your eyes by the coast and enjoy fresh cider from the local cider manufacture Ciderhuset.

In Balestrand you should stay at the Kviknes hotel, where many celebrities and important politicians have stayed during it’s more than 200 years of hisrtory. Many of the hotel rooms have a balcony with a fjord view, which makes waking up feel like waking up to a dream. The hotel also has one of the best restaurants in Balestrand called Kviknes Eating and Drinking.

Hope you enjoyed this article! 🙂